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Saint Patrick - Armed with Invincible Strength from God
Saint Patrick - Armed with Invincible Strength from God
Saint Patrick - Armed with Invincible Strength from God
 
 


Saint Patrick stained glass window; All Saints Episcopal Church, San Francisco, California; commons.wikimedia.org

Saint Patrick, Bishop
by Fr. Francis Xavier Weninger, 1877

Saint Patrick is called the Apostle of Ireland because he was the first to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ in that country. He was a native of France. At the age of sixteen, Patrick and his sister Lupsita were captured by pirates and sold as slaves in Ireland. His slavery lasted six years, and he was employed in guarding cattle. In this occupation, his life was holy and innocent. At the end of this time an angel delivered him, and brought him back to his native land. But he was captured and sold into slavery a second time, and was again liberated. God made known to Patrick, by repeated revelations, that he was chosen to bring about the conversion of the Irish race to the true faith. To fit himself for this, he earnestly applied himself to the study of letters.

As soon as he had acquired the requisite knowledge, he was raised to the priesthood. He now sought permission from the Sovereign Pontiff, Celestine, to preach the Gospel to the pagan people of Ireland. The Pope joyfully consented, and consecrated him Bishop. The Saint immediately set out upon his journey, accompanied by some zealous missionaries, and preached Ireland in the year 432. It is impossible to describe the labors and hardships the holy man had to undergo, the vexations and persecutions he suffered in preaching the religion of Christ. God blessed the efforts and sacrifices of Patrick to such a degree that in a short time whole cities submitted themselves to the yoke of Christ.

Other towns and places gradually followed, so that, during the thirty years of his apostolic career, he built three hundred churches, besides many monasteries. He divided the island into dioceses, and consecrated a Bishop for each See, and assigned Priests to every church, to continue the work of instructing the Christians and converting the pagans. Such a change of manners was wrought by the zeal of St. Patrick, and the lives of the inhabitants became so pure and edifying, that Ireland was called the "Isle of Saints."



 
 


Saint Patrick stained glass window; All Saints Episcopal Church, San Francisco, California; commons.wikimedia.org

Saint Patrick, Bishop
by Fr. Francis Xavier Weninger, 1877

Saint Patrick is called the Apostle of Ireland because he was the first to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ in that country. He was a native of France. At the age of sixteen, Patrick and his sister Lupsita were captured by pirates and sold as slaves in Ireland. His slavery lasted six years, and he was employed in guarding cattle. In this occupation, his life was holy and innocent. At the end of this time an angel delivered him, and brought him back to his native land. But he was captured and sold into slavery a second time, and was again liberated. God made known to Patrick, by repeated revelations, that he was chosen to bring about the conversion of the Irish race to the true faith. To fit himself for this, he earnestly applied himself to the study of letters.

As soon as he had acquired the requisite knowledge, he was raised to the priesthood. He now sought permission from the Sovereign Pontiff, Celestine, to preach the Gospel to the pagan people of Ireland. The Pope joyfully consented
and consecrated him Bishop. The Saint immediately set out upon his journey, accompanied by some zealous missionaries, and preached Ireland in the year 432. It is impossible to describe the labors and hardships the holy man had to undergo, the vexations and persecutions he suffered in preaching the religion of Christ. God blessed the efforts and sacrifices of Patrick to such a degree that in a short time whole cities submitted themselves to the yoke of Christ.

Other towns and places gradually followed, so that, during the thirty years of his apostolic career, he built three hundred churches, besides many monasteries. He divided the island into dioceses, and consecrated a Bishop for each See, and assigned Priests to every church, to continue the work of instructing the Christians and converting the pagans. Such a change of manners was wrought by the zeal of St. Patrick, and the lives of the inhabitants became so pure and edifying, that Ireland was called the "Isle of Saints."

 
 


Saint Patrick stained glass window; All Saints Episcopal Church, San Francisco, California; commons.wikimedia.org

Saint Patrick, Bishop
by Fr. Francis Xavier Weninger, 1877

Saint Patrick is called the Apostle of Ireland because he was the first to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ in that country. He was a native of France. At the age of sixteen, Patrick and his sister Lupsita were captured by pirates and sold as slaves in Ireland. His slavery lasted six years, and he was employed in guarding cattle. In this occupation, his life was holy and innocent. At the end of this time an angel delivered him, and brought him back to his native land. But he was captured and sold into slavery a second time, and was again liberated. God made known to Patrick, by repeated revelations, that he was chosen to bring about the conversion of the Irish race to the true faith. To fit himself for this, he earnestly applied himself to the study of letters.

As soon as he had acquired the requisite knowledge, he was raised to the priesthood. He now sought permission from the Sovereign Pontiff, Celestine, to preach the Gospel to the pagan people of Ireland. The Pope joyfully consented, and consecrated him Bishop. The Saint immediately set out upon his journey, accompanied by some zealous missionaries, and preached Ireland in the year 432. It is impossible to describe the labors and hardships the holy man had to undergo, the vexations and persecutions he suffered in preaching the religion of Christ. God blessed the efforts and sacrifices of Patrick to such a degree that in a short time whole cities submitted themselves to the yoke of Christ.

Other towns and places gradually followed, so that, during the thirty years of his apostolic career, he built three hundred churches, besides many monasteries. He divided the island into dioceses, and consecrated a Bishop for each See, and assigned Priests to every church, to continue the work of instructing the Christians and converting the pagans. Such a change of manners was wrought by the zeal of St. Patrick, and the lives of the inhabitants became so pure and edifying, that Ireland was called the "Isle of Saints."






The powers of hell were not idle; they attempted every obstacle imaginable against the propagation of the Gospel. But St. Patrick surmounted them all with Divine assistance. Leogarius, one of the mightiest kings of the island, and his magicians, resisted the Saint with all their might. But seeing the numerous miracles with which the holy Bishop confirmed the truth of his doctrine, the king granted him full liberty to preach in his domain.

The pagan priests, furious at the success of Patrick, set on foot an uprising against the new Christians. They rose in arms to annihilate Christianity at one blow. The idolaters were ready to fall upon the converts, when, in the middle of a bright, clear day, a terrific thunderstorm burst forth from the heavens, which dispersed and routed the whole troop of pagans.

The magicians, who were very numerous at the court of Leogarius, were put to shame, and left the service of the idols to become fervent Christians. The chief sorcerer alone remained obdurate. He, imitating the famous Simon Magus, promised to ascend into heaven; but as the latter had been cast to the earth by the prayers of Peter [Acts of the Apostles 8:9-24], so, at the prayers of St. Patrick, the prodigy was repeated, and the magician fell dead to the ground. This miracle was followed by numerous conversions.



 


Slemish, mountain in County Antrim where Saint Patrick is reputed to have shepherded as a slave. commons.wikimedia.org
 
 
 
 
 
 



The powers of hell were not idle; they opposed all imaginable obstacles to the propagation of the Gospel. But St. Patrick surmounted them all with Divine assistance. Leogarius, one of the mightiest kings of the island, and his magicians, resisted the Saint with all their might. But seeing the numerous miracles with which the holy Bishop confirmed the truth of his doctrine, the king granted him full liberty to preach in his domain.

The pagan priests, furious at the success of Patrick, set on foot an uprising against the new Christians. The idolaters were ready to fall upon the converts, when, in the middle of a bright, clear day, a terrific thunderstorm burst forth from the heavens, which dispersed and routed the whole troop of pagans.

The magicians, who were very numerous at the court of Leogarius, were put to shame, and left the service of the idols to become fervent Christians. The chief
 


Slemish, mountain in County Antrim where Saint Patrick is reputed to have shepherded as a slave. commons.wikimedia.org
 
 
 
 
 
 
sorcerer alone remained obdurate. He, imitating the famous Simon Magus, promised to ascend into heaven; but as the latter had been cast to the earth by the prayers of Peter [Acts of the Apostles 8:9-24], so, at the prayers of St. Patrick, the prodigy was repeated, and the magician fell dead to the ground. This miracle was followed by numerous conversions.



Slemish, mountain in County Antrim where Saint Patrick is reputed to have shepherded as a slave. commons.wikimedia.org



The powers of hell were not idle; they attempted every obstacle imaginable against the propagation of the Gospel. But St. Patrick surmounted them all with Divine assistance. Leogarius, one of the mightiest kings of the island, and his magicians, resisted the Saint with all their might. But seeing the numerous miracles with which the holy Bishop confirmed the truth of his doctrine, the king granted him full liberty to preach in his domain.

The pagan priests, furious at the success of Patrick, set on foot an uprising against the new Christians. They rose in arms to annihilate Christianity at one blow. The idolaters were ready to fall upon the converts, when, in the middle of a bright, clear day, a terrific thunderstorm burst forth from the heavens, which dispersed and routed the whole troop of pagans.

The magicians, who were very numerous at the court of Leogarius, were put to shame, and left the service of the idols to become fervent Christians. The chief sorcerer alone remained obdurate. He, imitating the famous Simon Magus, promised to ascend into heaven; but as the latter had been cast to the earth by the prayers of Peter [Acts of the Apostles 8:9-24], so, at the prayers of St. Patrick, the prodigy was repeated, and the magician fell dead to the ground. This miracle was followed by numerous conversions.



 
 


Croagh Patrick. Looking westwards on the summit, Clare Island can be seen on the right of the picture. commons.wikimedia.org
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Saint Patrick’s bed: This is the supposed site of St. Patrick’s bed. He ascended the mountain in 441 AD and spent the 40 days of Lent fasting on the summit. The highest point of Croagh Patrick (764 metres) is in the background. commons.wikimedia.org

The converts were most powerfully impelled to become fervent disciples of Jesus by the holy life and the many miracles of St. Patrick. The Saint gave his whole time to apostolic labors. He never would hear of repose or relaxation to renew his strength. His zeal for the glory of God and the salvation of souls was insatiable. He was not dismayed by any difficulty or hardship--his ardor was only enkindled the more.

He traversed the whole island on foot, representing to the pagans their errors, and explaining to them the Christian religion. He instructed the rich and poor, the old and young, not only in the truths of faith, but also in reading and writing, because no others had any knowledge of letters.

After having instructed them, he baptized thousands with his own hands. He consoled the sorrowing, assisted the destitute, visited and nursed the sick; in the words of the Apostle, "he became all things to all men, that he might save all." In these many and varied duties, his soul was most closely united to God, by constant ejaculations which he sent to heaven, to show his love for God and to call down the Divine help on all his undertakings.

His body was always clad in a rough hair shirt, and he made use of an almost perpetual fast. He divided the night into three parts: the first he devoted to the recitation of one hundred Psalms of David; the second he spent in saying the remaining fifty psalms and other pious devotions; the third was allotted to sleep, which he always took on hard stone.

The miracles which he wrought are not less numerous nor less remarkable than those of the apostles.

He dissipated the most violent storms by the sign of the cross; he restored sight to the blind, speech to the dumb, and hearing to the deaf. He even recalled the dead back to life; the sick were healed by his simple touch. He also had the gift of looking into the unknown future and of penetrating the secrets of the heart, as we find recorded in his life.

In a word, he was a true apostle of Christ, whether we regard the many toils and labors he underwent in the conversion of the heathen, or his many miracles and his holy life. Even unbelievers highly venerated him on account of all these.




The converts were most powerfully impelled to become fervent disciples of Jesus by the holy life and the many miracles of St. Patrick. The Saint gave his whole time to apostolic labors. He never would hear of repose or relaxation to renew his strength. His zeal for the glory of God and the salvation of souls was insatiable. He was not dismayed by any difficulty or hardship--his ardor was only enkindled the more.

He traversed the whole island on foot, representing to the pagans their errors, and explaining to them the Christian religion. He instructed the rich and poor, the old and young, not only in the truths of faith, but also in reading and writing, because no others had any knowledge of letters.

After having instructed them, he baptized thousands with his own hands. He consoled the sorrowing, assisted the destitute, visited and nursed the sick; in the words of the Apostle, "he became all things to all men, that he might save all." In these many and varied duties, his soul was most closely united to God, by constant ejaculations which he sent to heaven, to show his love for God and to call down the Divine help on all his undertakings.

His body was always clad in a rough hair shirt, and he made use of an almost perpetual fast. He divided the night into three parts: the first he devoted to the recitation of one hundred Psalms of David; the second he spent in saying the remaining fifty psalms and other pious devotions; the third was allotted to sleep, which he always took on hard stone.

The miracles which he wrought are not less numerous nor less remarkable than those of the apostles.



He dissipated the most violent storms by the sign of the cross; he restored sight to the blind, speech to the dumb, and hearing to the deaf. He even recalled the dead back to life; the sick were healed by his simple touch. He also had the gift of looking into the unknown future and of penetrating the secrets of the heart, as we find recorded in his life.

In a word, he was a true apostle of Christ, whether we regard the many toils and labors he underwent in the conversion of the heathen, or his many miracles and his holy life. Even unbelievers highly venerated him on account of all these.

 
 


Croagh Patrick. Looking westwards on the summit, Clare Island can be seen on the right of the picture. commons.wikimedia.org
 

At last, after many years uninterruptedly spent in apostolic labors, God called His faithful servant to the reward prepared for him. He died at the age of eighty-three, in one of the many monasteries which he had founded for the education of zealous laborers who might prosecute his work of conversion.

A choir of heavenly voices was heard singing at his death, and a bright splendor was seen for twelve nights around the monastery, lighting up the whole neighborhood. Pagans and Christians beheld it with joy and astonishment.
 


Saint Patrick’s bed: This is the supposed site of St. Patrick’s bed. He ascended the mountain in 441 AD and spent the 40 days of Lent fasting on the summit. The highest point of Croagh Patrick (764 metres) is in the background. commons.wikimedia.org
 
We may say that the circumstances of the life of St. Patrick most deserving of admiration are: first, that amid the many perils to which he was exposed he preserved his virginal innocence untarnished during his long years; second, that one single man should be able to bear so many hardships and accomplish such glorious results for the honor of God and the salvation of souls.

But He who chose Patrick also bestowed on him His Holy Spirit, and armed him with the invincible strength of the apostles. The remains of the Saint repose in the cathedral of Down, and his tomb is famous for the many miracles wrought at it.

 


At last, after many years uninterruptedly spent in apostolic labors, God called His faithful servant to the reward prepared for him. He died at the age of eighty-three, in one of the many monasteries which he had founded for the education of zealous laborers who might prosecute his work of conversion.

A choir of heavenly voices was heard singing at his death, and a bright splendor was seen for twelve nights around the monastery, lighting up the whole neighborhood. Pagans and Christians beheld it with joy and astonishment.

We may say that the circumstances of the life of St. Patrick most deserving of admiration are: first, that amid the many perils to which he was exposed he preserved his virginal innocence untarnished during his long years; second, that one single man should be able to bear so many hardships and accomplish such glorious results for the honor of God and the salvation of souls.

But He who chose Patrick also bestowed on him His Holy Spirit, and armed him with the invincible strength of the apostles. The remains of the Saint repose in the cathedral of Down, and his tomb is famous for the many miracles wrought at it.




At last, after many years uninterruptedly spent in apostolic labors, God called His faithful servant to the reward prepared for him. He died at the age of eighty-three, in one of the many monasteries which he had founded for the education of zealous laborers who might prosecute his work of conversion.

A choir of heavenly voices was heard singing at his death, and a bright splendor was seen for twelve nights around the monastery, lighting up the whole neighborhood. Pagans and Christians beheld it with joy and astonishment.


 



Parish Church of St. John the Baptist, former church of the Augustinian Canons monastery Rebdorf, a district of Eichstätt (Upper Bavaria); wall painting b Joseph Dietrich (1696-1745); Illustration: Saint Patrick of Ireland; commons.wikimedia.org
 
 
 
 
 
 


Parish Church of St. John the Baptist, former church of the Augustinian Canons monastery Rebdorf, a district of Eichstätt (Upper Bavaria); wall painting b Joseph Dietrich (1696-1745); Illustration: Saint Patrick of Ireland; commons.wikimedia.org  

At last, after many years uninterruptedly spent in apostolic labors, God called His faithful servant to the reward prepared for him. He died at the age of eighty-three, in one of the many monasteries which he had founded for the education of zealous laborers who might prosecute his work of conversion.

A choir of heavenly voices was heard singing at his death, and a bright splendor was seen for twelve nights around the monastery, lighting up the whole neighborhood. Pagans and Christians beheld it with joy and astonishment.

We may say that the circumstances of the life of St. Patrick most deserving of admiration are: first, that amid the many perils to which he was exposed he preserved his virginal innocence untarnished during his long years; second, that one single man should be able to bear so many hardships and accomplish such glorious results for the honor of God and the salvation of souls.

But He who chose Patrick also bestowed on him His Holy Spirit, and armed him with the invincible strength of the apostles. The remains of the Saint repose in the cathedral of Down, and his tomb is famous for the many miracles wrought at it.

 
 
 


The Last Judgment by Giotto di Bondone; 1306; Cappella Scrovegni (Arena Chapel), Padua, Italy; www.wga.hu
 

Practical Considerations
by Fr. Francis Xavier Weninger, 1877
For thirty years did St. Patrick sacrifice himself for the glory of God and the salvation of souls, amid incredible labors and hardships.What labor have you undertaken? How much time have you devoted to the welfare of your own soul? I say, your own soul! The soul you have is your own; you yourself must take care of its salvation.

Were all men--nay, even were all the angels--solicitous about your soul, they could not bring it to heaven without your own active care. You can leave others to attend to every other concern or business without interfering, but, the salvation of your soul cannot be accomplished without your own personal exertions.

God, who created your soul without your assistance, will not save it without your cooperation. It is your soul; your body will be united to it for all eternity; it will be your soul forever. If you are careful of it, as God requires, you alone will enjoy the benefit of this care, and you will be happy for all eternity.

If, on the contrary, you are negligent, you alone will suffer, and be miserable for countless ages. Why, therefore, are you not more solicitous about your soul, on whose welfare so much depends? Why do you so often expose yourself to eternal ruin? “What have I done to thee?” said the ass, when she was beaten by Balaam-- "why strikest thou me, lo, now the third time?" (Book of Numbers, 22:27-28).

Does not your soul put the same question? “What have I done to thee? Why dost thou inflict so many deadly wounds on me by thy sins? Am I not thy soul? Wilt thou not feel the injury?” You cannot, with any sense of justice, answer these complaints. Resolve for the future to pay greater attention to the wellbeing of your soul.



 

Practical Considerations
by Fr. Francis Xavier Weninger, 1877

For thirty years did St. Patrick sacrifice himself for the glory of God and the salvation of souls, amid incredible labors and hardships.What labor have you undertaken? How much time have you devoted to the welfare of your own soul? I say, your own soul! The soul you have is your own; you yourself must take care of its salvation.

Were all men--nay, even were all the angels--solicitous about your soul, they could not bring it to heaven without your own active care. You can leave others to attend to every other concern or business without interfering, but, the salvation of your soul cannot be accomplished without your own personal exertions.

God, who created your soul without your assistance, will not save it without your cooperation. It is your soul; your body will be united to it for all eternity; it will be your soul forever. If you are


careful of it, as God requires, you alone will enjoy the benefit of this care, and you will be happy for all eternity.

If, on the contrary, you are negligent, you alone will suffer, and be miserable for countless ages. Why, therefore, are you not more solicitous about your soul, on whose welfare so much depends? Why do you so often expose yourself to eternal ruin? “What have I done to thee?” said the ass, when she was beaten by Balaam-- "why strikest thou me, lo, now the third time?" (Book of Numbers, 22:27-28).

Does not your soul put the same question? “What have I done to thee? Why dost thou inflict so many deadly wounds on me by thy sins? Am I not thy soul? Wilt thou not feel the injury?” You cannot, with any sense of justice, answer these complaints. Resolve for the future to pay greater attention to the wellbeing of your soul.


Saint Patrick, intercede and pray for us


Saint Patrick, intercede and pray for us


Saint Patrick, intercede and pray for us









Statue of St. Patrick Aghagower, County Mayo, Ireland. Below this statue is an inscription which reads: This statue of St. Patrick (who founded a church here early in his Christian Mission) was unveiled and blessed by The Very Reverend Jackie Conroy P.P. on the 15th August 2006.

It was from here that St. Patrick and some members of his household accompanied by St. Benan of Kilbannon departed on Shrove Saturday in the year 441 to spend 40 days of Lent on Cruaghan Aigle (now Croagh Patrick) from whence they returned on Holy Saturday to celebrate Easter with Bishop Sinach in Aghagower.



 
 




And when the ass saw the angel standing, she fell under the feet of the rider:

who being angry beat her sides more vehemently with a staff.

And the Lord opened the mouth of the ass, and she said:

What have I done to thee? Why strikest thou me, lo, now this third time?

Book of Numbers 22:27-28







And when the ass saw the angel standing, she fell under the feet of the rider:

who being angry beat her sides more vehemently with a staff.

And the Lord opened the mouth of the ass, and she said:

What have I done to thee? Why strikest thou me, lo, now this third time?

Book of Numbers 22:27-28










Statue of St. Patrick Aghagower, County Mayo, Ireland. Below this statue is an inscription which reads: This statue of St. Patrick (who founded a church here early in his Christian Mission) was unveiled and blessed by The Very Reverend Jackie Conroy P.P. on the 15th August 2006.




 
 



It was from here that St. Patrick and some members of his household accompanied by St. Benan of Kilbannon departed on Shrove Saturday in the year 441 to spend 40 days of Lent on Cruaghan Aigle (now Croagh Patrick) from whence they returned on Holy Saturday to celebrate Easter with Bishop Sinach in Aghagower.

 
 
 
March 17 - Saint Patrick - Armed with Invincible Strength from God - Bishop and Missionary - (c. 385-462)
 
 
 
 
March 17 - Saint Patrick - Armed with Invincible Strength from God - Bishop and Missionary - (c. 385-462)


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top
X
OUR FATHER

Our Father, Who Art In Heaven
Hallowed Be Thy Name.
Thy Kingdom come,
Thy Will be done
On earth as it is in Heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread
And forgive us our trespasses
As we forgive those who trespass against us.
Liberate us from all temptation[*]
And deliver us from all evil. Amen



[*] Liberate us is in keeping with the original Latin text.
       God usually does not "lead us" to temptation
       (unless we are tested),
       but gives us the grace to overcome and/or resist it
X
HAIL MARY

Hail Mary, full of grace
The Lord is with thee.
Blessed art though among women,
And blessed is the fruit
Of thy womb, Jesus.
 
Holy Mary, Mary of God
Pray for us sinners
Now, and in the hour
Of our death. Amen


 
X
APOSTLE'S CREED

I believe in God, the Father Almighty Creator of Heaven and earth;
And in Jesus Christ, His Only Son, our Lord;
Who was conceived by the
[work and grace of the] Holy Ghost,[*]
Born of the Virgin Mary,
Suffered under Pontius Pilate,
Was crucified, died and was buried.
He descended into the Dead.[**]
On the third day, He rose again;
He ascended into Heaven,
And sits at the right hand of God,
the Father Almighty.
From thence he shall come to judge
the living and the dead.
 
I believe in the Holy Ghost,[*]
The Holy Catholic Church,
The communion of saints,
The forgiveness of sins.
The resurrection of the body,
And life everlasting. Amen


[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
[**] the Dead: "inferi", the underworld or the dead in Latin.
X
GLORIA

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Ghost[*],
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and ever shall be, world without end.
Amen

[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
X
DE PROFUNDIS

Out of the depths I have cried to Thee, O Lord:
Lord, hear my voice.
Let Thine ears be attentive
to the voice of my supplication.

If thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities:
Lord, who shall abide it.
For with Thee there is merciful forgiveness:
and because of Thy law,
I have waited for Thee, O Lord.

My soul hath waited on His word:
my soul hath hoped in the Lord.
From the morning-watch even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.

For with the Lord there is mercy:
and with Him plenteous redemption.
And He shall redeem Israel
from all her iniquities.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Ghost[*],
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and ever shall be, world without end.
Amen

[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
X
DE PROFUNDIS

Out of the depths I have cried to Thee, O Lord:
Lord, hear my voice.
Let Thine ears be attentive to the voice
of my supplication.

If thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities:
Lord, who shall abide it.
For with Thee there is merciful forgiveness:
and because of Thy law,
I have waited for Thee, O Lord.

My soul hath waited on His word:
my soul hath hoped in the Lord.
From the morning-watch even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.

For with the Lord there is mercy:
and with Him plenteous redemption.
And He shall redeem Israel
from all his iniquities.

V. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord.
R. And let perpetual light shine upon them.
V. From the gate of hell.
R. Deliver their souls, O Lord.
V. May then rest in peace.
R. Amen.
V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. And let my cry come unto Thee.
V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with Thy Spirit.

(50 days indulgence to all who pray the De Profundis with V. and R.
"Requiem aeternam" (Eternal Rest) three times a day.
Pope Leo XIII, February 3, 1888)


Let us pray:
O God, the Creator and Redeemer of all
the faithful, we beseech Thee to grant
to the souls of Thy servants the remission
of their sins, so that by our prayers
they may obtain pardon for which they long.
O Lord, who lives and reigns,
world without end. Amen

May they rest in peace. Amen

CERRAR
SIGUIENTE
PADRE NUESTRO

Padre Nuestro,
que estas en los Cielos
Santificado sea Tu Nombre;
Venga a nosotros tu Reino;
Hágase Tu Voluntad
en la tierra como en el cielo.
Danos hoy nuestro pan de cada día;
Perdona nuestras ofensas,
Como también nosotros
perdonamos a los que nos ofenden,
No nos dejes caer en la tentación,
y líbranos del mal. Amén
 
CERRAR
SIGUIENTE
AVE MARÍA

Dios te salve, María,
llena eres de gracia;
El Señor es Contigo;
Bendita Tú eres
entre todas las mujeres,
Y bendito es el fruto
De tu vientre, Jesús.
 
Santa María,
Madre de Dios,
Ruega por nosotros
pecadores,
Ahora y en la hora
De nuestra muerte.
Amén
 
CERRAR
CREDO

Creo en Dios, Padre Todopoderoso,
Creador del cielo y de la tierra.
Creo en Jesucristo,
Su único Hijo, Nuestro Señor,
Que fue concebido por obra
y gracia del Espíritu Santo,
Nació de la Santa María Virgen;
Padeció bajo el poder de Poncio Pilato,
Fue crucificado, muerto y sepultado,
Descendió a los infiernos,
Al tercer día resucitó de entre los muertos,
Subió a los cielos
Y está sentado a la derecha de Dios,
Padre Todopoderoso.
Desde allí ha de venir a juzgar
a los vivos y a los muertos.

Creo en el Espíritu Santo,
La Santa Iglesia Católica,
La comunión de los santos,
El perdón de los pecados,
La resurrección de la carne
Y la vida eterna. Amén
 
 
CERRAR
DE PROFUNDIS

Desde lo hondo a Ti grito, Señor; Señor,
escucha mi voz;
Estén Tus oidos atentos
a la voz de mi súplica.

Si llevas cuenta de los delitos, Señor,
¿quién podrá resistir?
Pero de ti procede el perdón,
y así infundes respeto.
Mi alma espera en el Señor.

Espera en su palabra;
mi alma aguarda al Señor,
más que el centinela la aurora.
Aguarda Israel al Señor.

Como el centinela la aurora;
porque del Señor viene la misericordia.
la redención copiosa;
y Él redimirá a Israel de todos sus delitos.

Gloria al Padre, al Hijo y al
Espíritu Santo,
como es desde el principio,
es ahora y será por los siglos de los siglos.
Amén

X
GLORIA

Gloria al Padre, al Hijo y al
Espíritu Santo,
como es desde el principio,
es ahora y será por los siglos de los siglos.
Amén

CERRAR
DE PROFUNDIS

Desde lo hondo a Ti grito, Señor;
Señor, escucha mi voz;
Estén Tus oidos atentos a
la voz de mi súplica.

Si llevas cuenta de los delitos, Señor,
¿quién podrá resistir?

Pero de ti procede el perdón,
y así infundes respeto.
Mi alma espera en el Señor.

Espera en su palabra;
mi alma aguarda al Señor,
más que el centinela la aurora.
Aguarda Israel al Señor.

Como el centinela la aurora;
porque del Señor viene la misericordia,
la redención copiosa;
y Él redimirá a Israel de todos sus delitos.

V. Dadles, Señor, a todas las almas
el descanso eterno.
R. Y haced lucir sobre ellas
vuestra eterna luz.
V. Que en paz descansen.
R. Amén.