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Seek God when we have the misfortune to lose Him through sin
Seek God when we have the misfortune to lose Him through sin
Seek God when we have the misfortune to lose Him through sin
Seek God when we have the misfortune to lose Him through sin
 
 
 

 
 

The Adoration of the Magi Kings by Fra Angelico(1395-1455) and Fra Filippo Lippi (1406-1469); circa 1440-60; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; commons.wikimedia.org
 
 
Feast of the Three Kings (Epiphany) January 6th
by Rev. Frederick A. Reuter

The story of the Eastern Kings who followed the miraculous star till it led them to the Infant Jesus in Bethlehem, is one of continued interest and charm. Rehearsed as it is each year in the many churches of Christendom, the narrative loses nothing of its beauty; nor does the example of the Magi, our forefathers in the faith, ever fail to point a salutary moral to those of us who consider it well. The lesson I most ordinarily drawn from the Gospel of the Epiphany, wherein the narrative is embalmed, is that, in the faith of the Magi we have a perfect model of what our own faith should be in the various circumstances and trials of life. While this application of the tale of the Wise Men is as salutary as it is evident, their example teaches another lesson equally instructive and perhaps still more necessary. That example shows us in very truth how we should seek God when we have the misfortune to lose Him through sin; how we should act when we have the happiness of finding Him; and, finally, how we should conduct ourselves after finding Him--after our conversion.

These Magi whom the miraculous star invited to approach the new-born King of the Jews were pagans, having no other gods than inanimate idols; they were wanderers, traveling far away from the road to salvation; they were poor sinners, wrapped in the shadows of death. Suddenly the merciful voice of God makes itself heard in the depths of their hearts, and just as suddenly they arise and earnestly seek the newly born. Earnestness in their search implies their prosecuting it promptly, and accordingly they make no delay.

"We have seen His star," they said; "and have come to adore Him." They allowed no interval between their seeing and their setting forth; that is, between seeing the truth and accepting it; between the knowledge of their duty and its fulfilment; between seeing good to be done and doing it. In their case faith becomes conviction, desire leads immediately to resolve, and purpose is forthwith reduced to practice. The grace of God touches them and triumphs at once. No need of its repeated attacks, of long hours or days of conflict, of frequent cheeks, before its victory is achieved; they have seen and have come.

How account for the promptitude, the haste one might almost say, of these Wise Men? Easily enough. They saw in the wonderful star the will of God, Who called them to Him. If at the first intimation of that sacred will they hasten to accomplish it, they merely proclaim the importance of the task of finding God. Not to obey His call immediately, would be to risk losing Him forever. As a matter of historical fact, would not this have been the result of the Magi’s delaying their journey? Supposing that they had waited several weeks, or even a few days only, before entrusting themselves to the- guidance of the star, would they have found Jesus Christ? Vainly would they have sought Him in Jerusalem, in Bethlehem, or in the surrounding country, since He had taken His flight into Egypt, where He remained hidden and unknown. Had the search of the Magi, in a word, not been prompt, it would have proved futile. Does not the course of action of these Wise Men rebuke us, who habitually put off, postpone, and delay with unfailing stubbornness the execution of God’s orders?

We, too, have seen. God has shown us--not indeed by a star, but by a still more brilliant light--the duties which we should perform, the virtues to practice, and the vices to shun. How many of us have forthwith set about the performance, the practice and the’ shunning? We have seen, more clearly than the Wise Men observed their road, the path that we should follow, the law of God and that of His Church which we should obey; and how many of us have hastened at once to follow it ? We have seen the tyranny of our passions, yet we fail to bridle them; proximate occasions of sin, and we do not shun them; scandals and injustice in our lives, and we do not repair them. "We have seen, in fine, those secret affections which divide our hearts between creatures and the Creator; the hidden pride that dominates our conduct, the jealousy and hatred that make of us their prey. We have also seen clearly and repeatedly the indifference and criminal apathy with which we treat the important affair of our salvation. Alas, for us, that our seeing has not been followed by that readiness to act which signalized the Eastern Kings! Instead of saying "We have come," we have contented ourselves with declaring ‘’We will come’’; will do what is right by and by; will reform our lives later on; will become converted all in good time.

And when will this by and by, this later on, this good time, this day of salvation, arrive? When we are more advanced in years, when our affairs are settled, when circumstances become more favorable-- in any case, before we die. Deceptive hope! Should we not rather fear that if we do not turn to God at once, if we abuse His divine grace any longer, we shall lose Him forever? Our future years will most likely be as sterile as have been our past ones; will be spent in vain longings and useless projects. Death will probably surprise us such as we habitually are-- filled with good intentions, yet the slave of criminal habits. We will seek God, but, in the words of the Apocalypse, we shall not find Him, and shall die in our sins.

The promptitude of the Magi in following the star was not more notable than was their generosity. Obedience to the divine call meant for them the abandonment of their states, separation from their families and friends, the undertaking of a journey of indefinite length, the braving of the most rigorous of the seasons, and infallible exposure to the derision of the world. None of these considerations availed to turn them from their design, any more than did the difficulties which they could not but anticipate from their ignorance of the way and of the language of the country to which they were probably bound; or their fears of Herod, who might view them as conspirators against his sovereignty. They dreaded neither creatures nor men. God had called them; they obeyed at once, fully and freely. "We have seen His star, and are come to adore Him."


 
Feast of the Three Kings (Epiphany) January 6th
by Rev. Frederick A. Reuter

The story of the Eastern Kings who followed the miraculous star till it led them to the Infant Jesus in Bethlehem, is one of continued interest and charm. Rehearsed as it is each year in the many churches of Christendom, the narrative loses nothing of its beauty; nor does the example of the Magi, our forefathers in the faith, ever fail to point a salutary moral to those of us who consider it well. The lesson I most ordinarily drawn from the Gospel of the Epiphany, wherein the narrative is embalmed, is that, in the faith of the Magi we have a perfect model of what our own faith should be in the various circumstances and trials of life. While this application of the tale of the Wise Men is as salutary as it is evident, their example teaches another lesson equally instructive and perhaps still more necessary. That example shows us in very truth how we should seek God when we have the misfortune to lose Him through sin; how we should act when we have the happiness of finding Him; and, finally, how we should conduct ourselves after finding Him--after our conversion.

These Magi whom the miraculous star invited to approach the new-born King of the Jews were pagans, having no other gods than inanimate idols; they were wanderers, traveling far away from the road to salvation; they were poor sinners, wrapped in the shadows of death. Suddenly the merciful voice of God makes itself heard in the depths of their hearts, and just as suddenly they arise and earnestly seek the newly born. Earnestness in their search implies their prosecuting it promptly, and accordingly they make no delay.

"We have seen His star," they said; "and have come to adore Him." They allowed no interval between their seeing and their setting forth; that is, between seeing the truth and accepting it; between the knowledge of their duty and its fulfilment; between seeing good to be done and doing it. In their case faith becomes conviction, desire leads immediately to resolve, and purpose is forthwith reduced to practice. The grace of God touches them and triumphs at once. No need of its repeated attacks, of long hours or days of conflict, of frequent cheeks, before its victory is achieved; they have seen and have come.

How account for the promptitude, the haste one might almost say, of these Wise Men? Easily enough. They saw in the wonderful star the will of God, Who called them to Him. If at the first intimation of that sacred will they hasten to accomplish it, they merely proclaim the importance of the task of finding God. Not to obey His call immediately, would be to risk losing Him forever. As a matter of historical fact, would not this have been the result of the Magi’s delaying their journey? Supposing that they had waited several weeks, or even a few days only, before entrusting themselves to the- guidance of the star, would they have found Jesus Christ? Vainly would they have sought Him in Jerusalem, in Bethlehem, or in the surrounding country, since He had taken His flight into Egypt, where He remained hidden and unknown. Had the search of the Magi, in a word, not been prompt, it would have proved futile. Does not the course of action of these Wise Men rebuke us, who habitually put off, postpone, and delay with unfailing stubbornness the execution of God’s orders?

We, too, have seen. God has shown us--not indeed by a star, but by a still more brilliant light--the duties which we should perform, the virtues to practice, and the vices to shun. How many of us have forthwith set about the performance, the practice and the’ shunning? We have seen, more clearly than the Wise Men observed their road, the path that we should follow, the law of God and that of His Church which we should obey; and how many of us have hastened at once to follow it ? We have seen the tyranny of our passions, yet we fail to bridle them; proximate occasions of sin, and we do not shun them; scandals and injustice in our lives, and we do not repair them. "We have seen, in fine, those secret affections which divide our hearts between creatures and the Creator; the hidden pride that dominates our conduct, the jealousy and hatred that make of us their prey. We have also seen clearly and repeatedly the indifference and criminal apathy with which we treat the important affair of our salvation. Alas, for us, that our seeing has not been followed by that readiness to act which signalized the Eastern Kings! Instead of saying "We have come," we have contented ourselves with declaring ‘’We will come’’; will do what is right by and by; will reform our lives later on; will become converted all in good time.

And when will this by and by, this later on, this good time, this day of salvation, arrive? When we are more advanced in years, when our affairs are settled, when circumstances become more favorable-- in any case, before we die. Deceptive hope! Should we not rather fear that if we do not turn to God at once, if we abuse His divine grace any longer, we shall lose Him forever? Our future years will most likely be as sterile as have been our past ones; will be spent in vain longings and useless projects. Death will probably surprise us such as we habitually are-- filled with good intentions, yet the slave of criminal habits. We will seek God, but, in the words of the Apocalypse, we shall not find Him, and shall die in our sins.

The promptitude of the Magi in following the star was not more notable than was their generosity. Obedience to the divine call meant for them the abandonment of their states, separation from their families and friends, the undertaking of a journey of indefinite length, the braving of the most rigorous of the seasons, and infallible exposure to the derision of the world. None of these considerations availed to turn them from their design, any more than did the difficulties which they could not but anticipate from their ignorance of the way and of the language of the country to which they were probably bound; or their fears of Herod, who might view them as conspirators against his sovereignty. They dreaded neither creatures nor men. God had called them; they obeyed at once, fully and freely. "We have seen His star, and are come to adore Him."


 
 
 

 
 

The Adoration of the Magi Kings by Carlo Dolci (1616-1686); circa 1633-34; Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow, Scotland; commons.wikimedia.org
 
 
If we attempt to establish a parallel between their conduct and our own, shall we not blush for our lack of their generous spirit? When God calls us, when His grace presses us to become converted, we understand well enough that we should emerge from our lukewarmness; should abandon our sins; should break through the circle of the criminal habits that hems us in; should quit scandalous assemblies; should terminate dangerous intimacies; should observe, in fine, the Commandments of God and of His Church. But, because it would cost us some little effort, some trifling exhibition of moral courage to do so, we prefer to remain in our indifference, victims of our wicked habits, slaves to the tyranny of sin, working sinful works.

All through their journey the Magi display the same firmness and constancy that marked their setting out. The apparent deadlock when they arrive in Jerusalem and can learn nothing of the new-born King Whom they are seeking, does not daunt nor even disconcert them. "God has called us," they said; ‘’He will find a way to bring us to Him. Let us continue our search." They do not, like us, lose their constancy at the first check or trial that confronts them; do not advance toward God today to retrace their steps tomorrow, do not seek their Saviour only when the skies are fair, only to abandon Him when the storm-clouds gather. When the star disappears and they find themselves without a guide, they at once make use of all the ordinary means which grace places at their disposal. After having asked for information from the common people, they address themselves to the great. They consult the priests and doctors of the law as to the country in which the Messias is to be born. They approach even the court of Herod to secure the fullest information.

Is this our method of procedure when, having lost God by our sins, we form the half-hearted desire of finding Him again? Or when, beholding ourselves drifting away from Him, we think of drawing closer to His protecting arms? In doubt, do we consult those who are competent to direct us? Do we have recourse to most certain and efficacious means-- prayer, good works, confession, and Communion? Do we make any earnest effort to correct our evil habits? Do we shun the proximate occasions of sin? "If not, all in vain do we protest that we wish to save our souls, to become converted, to avoid evil and to do good. Only by imitating the promptitude and the generous courage of the Wise Men can we succeed in finding the Saviour Whom we so sorely need to seek.

Not less instructive than the method in which the Magi sought the Messias was their action when they stood in His presence. The star stopped, not over a royal palace, but over a deserted stable-cave; and, upon entering, they discover a feeble Babe lying in a crib, evidently the victim of great poverty, as are the young Mother and the middle-aged foster-father, who are His only courtiers. They contemplate the newly-born Whom Herod dreads, Whom Heaven points out as their Messias. Have they not been deceived? No: their faith shows them a God made man; and in the guise of a helpless Infant they behold the omnipotence of the Creator.

They do not keep to themselves the sentiments with which the contemplation of the Infant fills them: they give exterior expression to those sentiments, throwing themselves at His feet and offering Him divine honors. ‘’And, falling down,’’ says the Evangelist, "they adored Him." When in our churches and chapels, we contemplate this same God of Bethlehem hidden under the Eucharistie veil, do we always regard Him as the supreme Master of Heaven and earth? Do we, like the Wise Men, adore Him upon our altars, bend the knee with reverence before Him? Has human respect never prevented us from edifying our neighbor by giving external marks of our interior sentiments? And do we imitate the Magi in proffering to Our God the threefold tribute of our homage? Do we open our treasures and offer Him our gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh? The gold that He would have of us is a heart all inflamed with love-- an ardent charity manifested in our works. The frankincense that He desires to see burning at His feet is that of fervent prayer ascending to Heaven as an agreeable perfume. And the myrrh which He exacts of us is the mortification of our body, mind and heart, in the spirit of penance.

Finally, in the procedure of the Wise Men, on leaving Bethlehem we have a striking example of how we should conduct ourselves after having sought and found Our Lord in the Sacraments of Penance and Holy Eucharist. Having received an order from Heaven not to return to Herod, "they went back another way into their own country." They obeyed God’s will without hesitation, as promptly as they had yielded to the original inspiration that called them from their home. As for their promise given to Herod, or what that king and all Jerusalem would think of their breaking their word, they concern themselves not at all. God has spoken; that suffices. It is theirs only to obey.

To us, who possess God and His sanctifying grace, Heaven gives the same order: commands us to shun Herod, "who seeks the Child to destroy Him." Our Herod, as we all know, is the world anathematized by God; is all bad Christians, all enemies of God and our soul; all those who by their words and example endeavor to ravish us of our innocence; the companions who have led us into vice; the proximate occasions of our past transgressions.

Like the illustrious travelers whose example we have been considering, we too should constantly shun this Herod of sin, and follow a different road from that which we pursued in the days of our wandering far from God. We should no longer follow the inordinate desires of our hearts, no longer satisfy our passions, no longer pamper our senses; but rather accomplish everywhere and always the will of God.

Only by so doing--by taking another way, by substituting humility for pride, mortification for indulgence, prudence for reckless exposure to danger, fervor for tepidity--may we hope to reach our own country, the celestial kingdom which none but wise men will ever inhabit.



 
If we attempt to establish a parallel between their conduct and our own, shall we not blush for our lack of their generous spirit? When God calls us, when His grace presses us to become converted, we understand well enough that we should emerge from our lukewarmness; should abandon our sins; should break through the circle of the criminal habits that hems us in; should quit scandalous assemblies; should terminate dangerous intimacies; should observe, in fine, the Commandments of God and of His Church. But, because it would cost us some little effort, some trifling exhibition of moral courage to do so, we prefer to remain in our indifference, victims of our wicked habits, slaves to the tyranny of sin, working sinful works.

All through their journey the Magi display the same firmness and constancy that marked their setting out. The apparent deadlock when they arrive in Jerusalem and can learn nothing of the new-born King Whom they are seeking, does not daunt nor even disconcert them. "God has called us," they said; ‘’He will find a way to bring us to Him. Let us continue our search." They do not, like us, lose their constancy at the first check or trial that confronts them; do not advance toward God today to retrace their steps tomorrow, do not seek their Saviour only when the skies are fair, only to abandon Him when the storm-clouds gather. When the star disappears and they find themselves without a guide, they at once make use of all the ordinary means which grace places at their disposal. After having asked for information from the common people, they address themselves to the great. They consult the priests and doctors of the law as to the country in which the Messias is to be born. They approach even the court of Herod to secure the fullest information.

Is this our method of procedure when, having lost God by our sins, we form the half-hearted desire of finding Him again? Or when, beholding ourselves drifting away from Him, we think of drawing closer to His protecting arms? In doubt, do we consult those who are competent to direct us? Do we have recourse to most certain and efficacious means-- prayer, good works, confession, and Communion? Do we make any earnest effort to correct our evil habits? Do we shun the proximate occasions of sin? "If not, all in vain do we protest that we wish to save our souls, to become converted, to avoid evil and to do good. Only by imitating the promptitude and the generous courage of the Wise Men can we succeed in finding the Saviour Whom we so sorely need to seek.

Not less instructive than the method in which the Magi sought the Messias was their action when they stood in His presence. The star stopped, not over a royal palace, but over a deserted stable-cave; and, upon entering, they discover a feeble Babe lying in a crib, evidently the victim of great poverty, as are the young Mother and the middle-aged foster-father, who are His only courtiers. They contemplate the newly-born Whom Herod dreads, Whom Heaven points out as their Messias. Have they not been deceived? No: their faith shows them a God made man; and in the guise of a helpless Infant they behold the omnipotence of the Creator.

They do not keep to themselves the sentiments with which the contemplation of the Infant fills them: they give exterior expression to those sentiments, throwing themselves at His feet and offering Him divine honors. ‘’And, falling down,’’ says the Evangelist, "they adored Him." When in our churches and chapels, we contemplate this same God of Bethlehem hidden under the Eucharistie veil, do we always regard Him as the supreme Master of Heaven and earth? Do we, like the Wise Men, adore Him upon our altars, bend the knee with reverence before Him? Has human respect never prevented us from edifying our neighbor by giving external marks of our interior sentiments? And do we imitate the Magi in proffering to Our God the threefold tribute of our homage? Do we open our treasures and offer Him our gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh? The gold that He would have of us is a heart all inflamed with love-- an ardent charity manifested in our works. The frankincense that He desires to see burning at His feet is that of fervent prayer ascending to Heaven as an agreeable perfume. And the myrrh which He exacts of us is the mortification of our body, mind and heart, in the spirit of penance.

Finally, in the procedure of the Wise Men, on leaving Bethlehem we have a striking example of how we should conduct ourselves after having sought and found Our Lord in the Sacraments of Penance and Holy Eucharist. Having received an order from Heaven not to return to Herod, "they went back another way into their own country." They obeyed God’s will without hesitation, as promptly as they had yielded to the original inspiration that called them from their home. As for their promise given to Herod, or what that king and all Jerusalem would think of their breaking their word, they concern themselves not at all. God has spoken; that suffices. It is theirs only to obey.

To us, who possess God and His sanctifying grace, Heaven gives the same order: commands us to shun Herod, "who seeks the Child to destroy Him." Our Herod, as we all know, is the world anathematized by God; is all bad Christians, all enemies of God and our soul; all those who by their words and example endeavor to ravish us of our innocence; the companions who have led us into vice; the proximate occasions of our past transgressions.

Like the illustrious travelers whose example we have been considering, we too should constantly shun this Herod of sin, and follow a different road from that which we pursued in the days of our wandering far from God. We should no longer follow the inordinate desires of our hearts, no longer satisfy our passions, no longer pamper our senses; but rather accomplish everywhere and always the will of God.

Only by so doing--by taking another way, by substituting humility for pride, mortification for indulgence, prudence for reckless exposure to danger, fervor for tepidity--may we hope to reach our own country, the celestial kingdom which none but wise men will ever inhabit.



 
 
 

 
 

The Adoration of the Magi Kings by Luca Giordano(1634-1705); Palacio de Viana, Córdoba, Spain; commons.wikimedia.org
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Within the Octave of the Ephiphany of Our Lord Jesus Christ - Seek God when we have the misfortune to lose Him through sin
 
 

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top
X
OUR FATHER

Our Father, Who Art In Heaven
Hallowed Be Thy Name.
Thy Kingdom come,
Thy Will be done
On earth as it is in Heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread
And forgive us our trespasses
As we forgive those who trespass against us.
Liberate us from all temptation[*]
And deliver us from all evil. Amen



[*] Liberate us is in keeping with the original Latin text.
       God usually does not "lead us" to temptation
       (unless we are tested),
       but gives us the grace to overcome and/or resist it
X
HAIL MARY

Hail Mary, full of grace
The Lord is with thee.
Blessed art though among women,
And blessed is the fruit
Of thy womb, Jesus.
 
Holy Mary, Mary of God
Pray for us sinners
Now, and in the hour
Of our death. Amen


 
X
APOSTLE'S CREED

I believe in God, the Father Almighty Creator of Heaven and earth;
And in Jesus Christ, His Only Son, our Lord;
Who was conceived by the
[work and grace of the] Holy Ghost,[*]
Born of the Virgin Mary,
Suffered under Pontius Pilate,
Was crucified, died and was buried.
He descended into the Dead.[**]
On the third day, He rose again;
He ascended into Heaven,
And sits at the right hand of God,
the Father Almighty.
From thence he shall come to judge
the living and the dead.
 
I believe in the Holy Ghost,[*]
The Holy Catholic Church,
The communion of saints,
The forgiveness of sins.
The resurrection of the body,
And life everlasting. Amen


[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
[**] the Dead: "inferi", the underworld or the dead in Latin.
X
GLORIA

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Ghost[*],
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and ever shall be, world without end.
Amen

[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
X
DE PROFUNDIS

Out of the depths I have cried to Thee, O Lord:
Lord, hear my voice.
Let Thine ears be attentive
to the voice of my supplication.

If thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities:
Lord, who shall abide it.
For with Thee there is merciful forgiveness:
and because of Thy law,
I have waited for Thee, O Lord.

My soul hath waited on His word:
my soul hath hoped in the Lord.
From the morning-watch even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.

For with the Lord there is mercy:
and with Him plenteous redemption.
And He shall redeem Israel
from all her iniquities.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Ghost[*],
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and ever shall be, world without end.
Amen

[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
X
DE PROFUNDIS

Out of the depths I have cried to Thee, O Lord:
Lord, hear my voice.
Let Thine ears be attentive to the voice
of my supplication.

If thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities:
Lord, who shall abide it.
For with Thee there is merciful forgiveness:
and because of Thy law,
I have waited for Thee, O Lord.

My soul hath waited on His word:
my soul hath hoped in the Lord.
From the morning-watch even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.

For with the Lord there is mercy:
and with Him plenteous redemption.
And He shall redeem Israel
from all his iniquities.

V. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord.
R. And let perpetual light shine upon them.
V. From the gate of hell.
R. Deliver their souls, O Lord.
V. May they rest in peace.
R. Amen.
V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. And let my cry come unto Thee.
V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with Thy Spirit.

(50 days indulgence to all who pray the De Profundis with V. and R.
"Requiem aeternam" (Eternal Rest) three times a day.
Pope Leo XIII, February 3, 1888)


Let us pray:
O God, the Creator and Redeemer of all
the faithful, we beseech Thee to grant
to the souls of Thy servants the remission
of their sins, so that by our prayers
they may obtain pardon for which they long.
O Lord, who lives and reigns,
world without end. Amen

May they rest in peace. Amen

CERRAR
SIGUIENTE
PADRE NUESTRO

Padre Nuestro,
que estas en los Cielos
Santificado sea Tu Nombre;
Venga a nosotros tu Reino;
Hágase Tu Voluntad
en la tierra como en el cielo.
Danos hoy nuestro pan de cada día;
Perdona nuestras ofensas,
Como también nosotros
perdonamos a los que nos ofenden,
No nos dejes caer en la tentación,
y líbranos del mal. Amén
 
CERRAR
SIGUIENTE
AVE MARÍA

Dios te salve, María,
llena eres de gracia;
El Señor es Contigo;
Bendita Tú eres
entre todas las mujeres,
Y bendito es el fruto
De tu vientre, Jesús.
 
Santa María,
Madre de Dios,
Ruega por nosotros
pecadores,
Ahora y en la hora
De nuestra muerte.
Amén
 
CERRAR
CREDO

Creo en Dios, Padre Todopoderoso,
Creador del cielo y de la tierra.
Creo en Jesucristo,
Su único Hijo, Nuestro Señor,
Que fue concebido por obra
y gracia del Espíritu Santo,
Nació de la Santa María Virgen;
Padeció bajo el poder de Poncio Pilato,
Fue crucificado, muerto y sepultado,
Descendió a los infiernos,
Al tercer día resucitó de entre los muertos,
Subió a los cielos
Y está sentado a la derecha de Dios,
Padre Todopoderoso.
Desde allí ha de venir a juzgar
a los vivos y a los muertos.

Creo en el Espíritu Santo,
La Santa Iglesia Católica,
La comunión de los santos,
El perdón de los pecados,
La resurrección de la carne
Y la vida eterna. Amén
 
 
CERRAR
DE PROFUNDIS

Desde lo hondo a Ti grito, Señor; Señor,
escucha mi voz;
Estén Tus oidos atentos
a la voz de mi súplica.

Si llevas cuenta de los delitos, Señor,
¿quién podrá resistir?
Pero de ti procede el perdón,
y así infundes respeto.
Mi alma espera en el Señor.

Espera en su palabra;
mi alma aguarda al Señor,
más que el centinela la aurora.
Aguarda Israel al Señor.

Como el centinela la aurora;
porque del Señor viene la misericordia.
la redención copiosa;
y Él redimirá a Israel de todos sus delitos.

Gloria al Padre, al Hijo y al
Espíritu Santo,
como es desde el principio,
es ahora y será por los siglos de los siglos.
Amén

X
GLORIA

Gloria al Padre, al Hijo y al
Espíritu Santo,
como es desde el principio,
es ahora y será por los siglos de los siglos.
Amén

CERRAR
DE PROFUNDIS y QUE DESCANSEN EN PAZ

Desde lo hondo a Ti grito, Señor;
Señor, escucha mi voz;
Estén Tus oidos atentos a
la voz de mi súplica.

Si llevas cuenta de los delitos, Señor,
¿quién podrá resistir?

Pero de ti procede el perdón,
y así infundes respeto.
Mi alma espera en el Señor.

Espera en su palabra;
mi alma aguarda al Señor,
más que el centinela la aurora.
Aguarda Israel al Señor.

Como el centinela la aurora;
porque del Señor viene la misericordia,
la redención copiosa;
y Él redimirá a Israel de todos sus delitos.

V. Dadles, Señor, a todas las almas
el descanso eterno.
R. Y haced lucir sobre ellas
vuestra eterna luz.
V. Que en paz descansen.
R. Amén.