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Honoring the Forty Holy Martyrs of Sebaste, Armenia
Honoring the Forty Holy Martyrs of Sebaste, Armenia
Honoring the Forty Holy Martyrs of Sebaste, Armenia
Honoring the Forty Holy Martyrs of Sebaste, Armenia
 
 
 

 
 

The Forty Martyrs of Sebaste; Unknown Master, Greek; c. 1000; The Hermitage, Saint Petersburg, Russa; www.wga.hu

 
 
The Forty Martyrs of Sebaste
by Fr. Francis Xavier Weninger, 1877

In the time of Constantine the Great, the city of Sebaste was witness of a magnificent spectacle of Christian heroism, in the forty soldiers who sacrificed their lives for the Faith of Christ. Licinius, to whom Constantine had entrusted the government of a portion of the empire, was at first very friendly to the Christians, but afterwards played the part of a cruel tyrant towards them. He issued an edict to all the prefects to force the Christians to adore the pagan gods, and, in case of their refusal, to condemn them to death. Agricola, Governor of Armenia, published the imperial mandate and summoned the Christians before, him. The first to answer this summons were forty brave soldiers of the garrison of Sebaste. They openly proclaimed themselves followers of Christ and ready to suffer tortures, and even death, rather than deny their faith. Lysias, their general, endeavored by praising their former bravery, by promising them imperial favors and rewards, and finally by threatening them with an ignominious death, to turn them from their holy purpose of remaining disciples of the Crucified. The Christian heroes, however, fearlessly declared, that in a case where the honor of the King of kings and their own eternal welfare were at stake, they disregarded promises and threats, and scorned the favor or displeasure of the Emperor.

The Governor, provoked to anger, ordered the holy confessors to be bound with chains and cast into dungeons. He called them again and again before his tribunal, but, finding them always firm in their faith, inflicted cruel tortures on them and sent them back, to prison. During their confinement, they exhorted each other to perseverance with these words: "We have borne so many hardships, so often exposed our lives in the service of an earthly sovereign, and in defence of our country: shall we do less for the King of Heaven and in behalf of our own souls?" In this manner they encouraged each other, and begged of the Lord that He would strengthen them in their impending martyrdom. They employed a portion of their time in singing the Divine Praises. Our Saviour did not fail to assist and console His servants. In a vision, He addressed them in these terms: "The beginning is good, but he only who perseveres to the end will be saved." Shortly after this, sentence was pronounced on the forty martyrs, and immediately carried out.

They were first struck on the mouth with stones, and at nightfall conducted, in the middle of winter, to a frozen lake. They were condemned to sit there, naked, until death should put an end to their sufferings. There was also a hot bath in readiness, at a neighboring house, for those who should chance to go over to the service of the idols.


 
The Forty Martyrs of Sebaste
by Fr. Francis Xavier Weninger, 1877

In the time of Constantine the Great, the city of Sebaste was witness of a magnificent spectacle of Christian heroism, in the forty soldiers who sacrificed their lives for the Faith of Christ. Licinius, to whom Constantine had entrusted the government of a portion of the empire, was at first very friendly to the Christians, but afterwards played the part of a cruel tyrant towards them. He issued an edict to all the prefects to force the Christians to adore the pagan gods, and, in case of their refusal, to condemn them to death. Agricola, Governor of Armenia, published the imperial mandate and summoned the Christians before, him. The first to answer this summons were forty brave soldiers of the garrison of Sebaste. They openly proclaimed themselves followers of Christ and ready to suffer tortures, and even death, rather than deny their faith. Lysias, their general, endeavored by praising their former bravery, by promising them imperial favors and rewards, and finally by threatening them with an ignominious death, to turn them from their holy purpose of remaining disciples of the Crucified. The Christian heroes, however, fearlessly declared, that in a case where the honor of the King of kings and their own eternal welfare were at stake, they disregarded promises and threats, and scorned the favor or displeasure of the Emperor.

The Governor, provoked to anger, ordered the holy confessors to be bound with chains and cast into dungeons. He called them again and again before his tribunal, but, finding them always firm in their faith, inflicted cruel tortures on them and sent them back, to prison. During their confinement, they exhorted each other to perseverance with these words: "We have borne so many hardships, so often exposed our lives in the service of an earthly sovereign, and in defence of our country: shall we do less for the King of Heaven and in behalf of our own souls?" In this manner they encouraged each other, and begged of the Lord that He would strengthen them in their impending martyrdom. They employed a portion of their time in singing the Divine Praises. Our Saviour did not fail to assist and console His servants. In a vision, He addressed them in these terms: "The beginning is good, but he only who perseveres to the end will be saved." Shortly after this, sentence was pronounced on the forty martyrs, and immediately carried out.

They were first struck on the mouth with stones, and at nightfall conducted, in the middle of winter, to a frozen lake. They were condemned to sit there, naked, until death should put an end to their sufferings. There was also a hot bath in readiness, at a neighboring house, for those who should chance to go over to the service of the idols.


 
 
 

 
 

A Rare Icon of the Forty Holy Martyrs, signed by the Cretan Painter Philotheos Scoufos; circa 1665; www.cretesenesi.com
 
 

As soon as the Christian soldiers reached the lake, they took off their clothes and went out on the ice. Here they continued their praises of God, earnestly asking for the Divine assistance. "We are forty going on the ice," said they, "grant, O merciful Lord, that forty also may be crowned, and that none lose his crown. It is a favored number, which Thou hast ennobled by Thy holy fast. Elias sought and found God by a fast of forty, days." Near the martyrs were stationed the guards to watch that no one should escape. Some hours had already passed; the heroes still persevered in glorifying God by their chants, and continued to offer supplications to the throne of the Most High: the guards, however, had fallen asleep: the prison-keeper alone was watching. He suddenly beheld the martyrs environed by a shining light, and angels descending from heaven with magnificent crowns in their hands, which they placed on the heads of the soldiers. He remarked, however, that only thirty-nine were crowned. He said to himself: "There are forty Christians on the lake; where is the crown of the other one?" The mystery was soon solved. One of the number, unable to endure the cold any longer, had crawled to the bath, and by this act, denied his faith.

But God did not suffer this inconstancy to go unpunished, for the wretch died soon after entering the bath, losing his life and precipitating himself into the flames of hell; thus, by seeking to escape short sufferings, he also forfeited the heavenly reward due to perseverance. The thirty-nine were much grieved at this desertion, but they were gladdened by seeing the prison-keeper himself filling up their number again. For, reflecting on what he had just witnessed, he concluded that the faith of the Christians must be the only true one. Awaking the guards, he related to them his vision, and cried out, in a loud voice: "I also am a Christian, and will live and die with the Christians." He stripped off his garments, and, joining the martyrs on the, lake, begged them to petition the Lord to bestow a similar crown on him. Their prayer was heard, for an angel came down from heaven with the crown.

At the break of day, everything that had occurred in the night was reported to the Governor. He immediately ordered the forty martyrs to be drawn out of the lake, their limbs to be broken with clubs, and the bodies to be thrown into the fire. The icy water had deprived all of life, with the exception of one, who, being younger, was possessed of greater power of endurance. The name of this one was Melitho. His mother, seeing him still alive, said to him: "Persevere only a little longer, my child; Jesus is standing at the gate of heaven, hastening to your assistance." In the mean while, the bodies of the other confessors had been thrown into a cart and were carried to the burning pile. The mother, perceiving that her son was left behind, in the hope of bringing him over to the worship of the idols, took him on her shoulders, in order to place him on the cart or on the pile. Whilst carrying him, she encouraged and exhorted him to persevere by considerations on the shortness of life and the eternity of the reward. The courageous youth, whilst listening to the words of his mother, gave up the ghost. The pious mother, however, completed her task, and laid the corpse with those of the other martyrs, that he might be united, even in death, with his companions. Saint Basil, Saint Gregory of Nyssa, and many other holy fathers, delivered sermons, full of instruction and unction, on these holy martyrs.


 

As soon as the Christian soldiers reached the lake, they took off their clothes and went out on the ice. Here they continued their praises of God, earnestly asking for the Divine assistance. "We are forty going on the ice," said they, "grant, O merciful Lord, that forty also may be crowned, and that none lose his crown. It is a favored number, which Thou hast ennobled by Thy holy fast. Elias sought and found God by a fast of forty, days." Near the martyrs were stationed the guards to watch that no one should escape. Some hours had already passed; the heroes still persevered in glorifying God by their chants, and continued to offer supplications to the throne of the Most High: the guards, however, had fallen asleep: the prison-keeper alone was watching. He suddenly beheld the martyrs environed by a shining light, and angels descending from heaven with magnificent crowns in their hands, which they placed on the heads of the soldiers. He remarked, however, that only thirty-nine were crowned. He said to himself: "There are forty Christians on the lake; where is the crown of the other one?" The mystery was soon solved. One of the number, unable to endure the cold any longer, had crawled to the bath, and by this act, denied his faith.

But God did not suffer this inconstancy to go unpunished, for the wretch died soon after entering the bath, losing his life and precipitating himself into the flames of hell; thus, by seeking to escape short sufferings, he also forfeited the heavenly reward due to perseverance. The thirty-nine were much grieved at this desertion, but they were gladdened by seeing the prison-keeper himself filling up their number again. For, reflecting on what he had just witnessed, he concluded that the faith of the Christians must be the only true one. Awaking the guards, he related to them his vision, and cried out, in a loud voice: "I also am a Christian, and will live and die with the Christians." He stripped off his garments, and, joining the martyrs on the, lake, begged them to petition the Lord to bestow a similar crown on him. Their prayer was heard, for an angel came down from heaven with the crown.

At the break of day, everything that had occurred in the night was reported to the Governor. He immediately ordered the forty martyrs to be drawn out of the lake, their limbs to be broken with clubs, and the bodies to be thrown into the fire. The icy water had deprived all of life, with the exception of one, who, being younger, was possessed of greater power of endurance. The name of this one was Melitho. His mother, seeing him still alive, said to him: "Persevere only a little longer, my child; Jesus is standing at the gate of heaven, hastening to your assistance." In the mean while, the bodies of the other confessors had been thrown into a cart and were carried to the burning pile. The mother, perceiving that her son was left behind, in the hope of bringing him over to the worship of the idols, took him on her shoulders, in order to place him on the cart or on the pile. Whilst carrying him, she encouraged and exhorted him to persevere by considerations on the shortness of life and the eternity of the reward. The courageous youth, whilst listening to the words of his mother, gave up the ghost. The pious mother, however, completed her task, and laid the corpse with those of the other martyrs, that he might be united, even in death, with his companions. Saint Basil, Saint Gregory of Nyssa, and many other holy fathers, delivered sermons, full of instruction and unction, on these holy martyrs.


 
 
 

 
 

The Forty Holy Martyrs; Chapel of the Forty Holy Martyrs, Church of the Holy Seplucher in the Old City of Jerusalem; commons.wikimedia.org
 
 

ADMONITION

Before coming to the usual considerations, I will present to the reader the thoughts which arose in my mind at the reading of these incidents. These martyrs were all soldiers, and we find frequent mention, in the Calendar of Saints, of holy martyrs who followed the profession of arms. They underwent the most cruel tortures for the sake of Christ. But for such deeds of heroism, great virtue was necessary. Hence the folly of those who say that a soldier cannot live piously and save his soul. Thousands of martyrs were soldiers, and numberless holy confessors, had formerly been warriors. This is an undeniable proof, that it is not impossible to lead a Christian life in camp and obtain salvation. Thus, Saint John the Baptist did not advise the soldiers, who asked him "What was necessary for salvation?" to forsake the army, but insisted on this, that they be satisfied with their pay, treat no one ill, calumniate no one, etc., as it is written in Saint Luke.

A soldier, solicitous about his salvation, must apply himself to the faithful observance of the Commandments of God and the Church, avoid sins, especially those common in the army--for example, blasphemy, cursing, excess in drinking and gaming, robbing and cheating, and, above all, the abominable vice of impurity--of which not only the deeds but also the words and thoughts are to be shunned. He must likewise be on his guard against idleness and wicked companions, and entice no one to sin. He should be zealous for good works, devoutly say his night prayers early in the evening, frequent the Sacraments, be eager to hear the Word of God, obey his officers, and faithfully serve the master to whom he has sworn fidelity. Moreover, he should patiently bear the many and great hardships attached to his condition, out of love for God, offering them up in a spirit of penance for past offences. A soldier has often a more severe life than a Priest, even in the most austere religious order. He can gain exceeding great merit, if he makes use of the opportunities. Every Christian soldier, by observing these lessons, will be sanctified, and his salvation will be assured.


 

ADMONITION

Before coming to the usual considerations, I will present to the reader the thoughts which arose in my mind at the reading of these incidents. These martyrs were all soldiers, and we find frequent mention, in the Calendar of Saints, of holy martyrs who followed the profession of arms. They underwent the most cruel tortures for the sake of Christ. But for such deeds of heroism, great virtue was necessary. Hence the folly of those who say that a soldier cannot live piously and save his soul. Thousands of martyrs were soldiers, and numberless holy confessors, had formerly been warriors. This is an undeniable proof, that it is not impossible to lead a Christian life in camp and obtain salvation. Thus, Saint John the Baptist did not advise the soldiers, who asked him "What was necessary for salvation?" to forsake the army, but insisted on this, that they be satisfied with their pay, treat no one ill, calumniate no one, etc., as it is written in Saint Luke.

A soldier, solicitous about his salvation, must apply himself to the faithful observance of the Commandments of God and the Church, avoid sins, especially those common in the army--for example, blasphemy, cursing, excess in drinking and gaming, robbing and cheating, and, above all, the abominable vice of impurity--of which not only the deeds but also the words and thoughts are to be shunned. He must likewise be on his guard against idleness and wicked companions, and entice no one to sin. He should be zealous for good works, devoutly say his night prayers early in the evening, frequent the Sacraments, be eager to hear the Word of God, obey his officers, and faithfully serve the master to whom he has sworn fidelity. Moreover, he should patiently bear the many and great hardships attached to his condition, out of love for God, offering them up in a spirit of penance for past offences. A soldier has often a more severe life than a Priest, even in the most austere religious order. He can gain exceeding great merit, if he makes use of the opportunities. Every Christian soldier, by observing these lessons, will be sanctified, and his salvation will be assured.


 
 
 

 
 

The Forty Holy Martyrs of Sebaste; Old Church of Saint Stephen of Arnaia, Greece. Photo by Mr. Asterios Karastergios; www.dimosaristoteli.gr
 
 
Practical Considerations

I. The sad example of the apostate is worthy of consideration. A Christian, who had already suffered much for Christ’s sake, becomes a traitor at the last moment. To escape a short pain, and enjoy a small relief, he forfeits everlasting joys and falls into the pit of hell. In the first picture, behold the weakness and inconstancy of man; learn from it to call daily upon the Almighty for His grace and strength; and do not trust too much in yourself. In the second picture, you see yourself. Often, for a sinful gratification, a slight gain, or to avoid a little trouble, you have grievously offended the Divine Majesty and exposed your soul to eternal perdition. Of course you hope to escape this danger by penance; but do you imagine that this apostate expected to die in his sin? I believe that he intended to repent and come back to the fold of Christ. His denial, probably, was only by words, in the expectation of repenting of his fault at some future time. His hopes were vain. He perished miserably in his sin; there was no time of repentance for him. May not this be your lot also? May not your hopes also be delusive? Think well on this, and never wilfully expose yourself to such a danger. Consider, further, how this soldier must pine, when he reflects on the meanness of the comfort for which he exchanged an eternity of bliss. The same useless mourning will be your share, if you lose heaven--not perhaps by apostasy, but by some other mortal sin. Meditate seriously on this subject, and be watchful, that you may not one day undergo a similar experience.


 
Practical Considerations

I. The sad example of the apostate is worthy of consideration. A Christian, who had already suffered much for Christ’s sake, becomes a traitor at the last moment. To escape a short pain, and enjoy a small relief, he forfeits everlasting joys and falls into the pit of hell. In the first picture, behold the weakness and inconstancy of man; learn from it to call daily upon the Almighty for His grace and strength; and do not trust too much in yourself. In the second picture, you see yourself. Often, for a sinful gratification, a slight gain, or to avoid a little trouble, you have grievously offended the Divine Majesty and exposed your soul to eternal perdition. Of course you hope to escape this danger by penance; but do you imagine that this apostate expected to die in his sin? I believe that he intended to repent and come back to the fold of Christ. His denial, probably, was only by words, in the expectation of repenting of his fault at some future time. His hopes were vain. He perished miserably in his sin; there was no time of repentance for him. May not this be your lot also? May not your hopes also be delusive? Think well on this, and never wilfully expose yourself to such a danger. Consider, further, how this soldier must pine, when he reflects on the meanness of the comfort for which he exchanged an eternity of bliss. The same useless mourning will be your share, if you lose heaven--not perhaps by apostasy, but by some other mortal sin. Meditate seriously on this subject, and be watchful, that you may not one day undergo a similar experience.


 
 
 

 
 

The Forty Martyrs of Sebaste; ivory relief panel; Constantinople, 10th century AD. Museum für Byzantinische Kunst (Inv. no. 574; acquired in 1828; Bartoldi collection), Bode-Museum, Berlin. commons.wikimedia.org
 
 

II. Impress deeply on your soul the conclusion which the holy martyrs reached: "If we have borne so many hardships for an earthly sovereign and for our country, why should we not do the same for the King of Kings and for our eternal welfare?" You, perhaps, put up with many inconveniences; you work or suffer for the sake of some person, or for a small profit. Now, why do you refuse to suffer for God, who promises you an eternal and immense reward? Animate yourself with the thought of the greatness of the Master you serve, and of the infinite recompense promised. The mother of Saint Melitho said: "The pains are short, the joys endless." Call to mind these words, when you feel discouraged in your work or trials. "Rejoice, my soul," said Saint Chrysologus; "for the afflictions you undergo are transitory, while the glory awaiting you is eternal."

The same holy father, speaking of the recompense which God bestows on His faithful servants, and of that which Satan confers on his followers, says: "Behold how the devil rewards the services rendered to him! Death terminates life, and begins the torture. But the servants of Jesus despise death, and receive eternal bliss for their recompense." The poor renegade deserved the former, the firm and persevering soldiers obtained the latter. Whose service do you choose? For whose love will you labor and suffer? To whom do you offer up your works and toils?

"I, says the Prophet David, "speak my works to the King" - - that is, "to God, the King of kings-- to Him I dedicate all my labors; whatsoever I do or suffer, it is for His love and honor, and my sole aim is to serve Him" (Ps. xliv.). The memory of the great reward promised to the faithful servant urged him to say this, as he himself tells us: "I have inclined my heart to do Thy justifications forever, for the reward" (Ps. cxviii.). Imitate his example. Offer all to the Lord, and serve Him with zeal and joy. "Serve ye the Lord with gladness," says David (Ps. xcix.); A servant works with joy when he is promised great wages. Your pay is infinitely great: serve God, then, with joy; but also persevere to the end. If, like the poor wretch, you desert the service of Jesus and enter that of Satan, you need hope for no reward in heaven. For Truth itself has said: "But he that shall persevere unto the end, he shall be saved" (Matt. x.).




 

II. Impress deeply on your soul the conclusion which the holy martyrs reached: "If we have borne so many hardships for an earthly sovereign and for our country, why should we not do the same for the King of Kings and for our eternal welfare?" You, perhaps, put up with many inconveniences; you work or suffer for the sake of some person, or for a small profit. Now, why do you refuse to suffer for God, who promises you an eternal and immense reward? Animate yourself with the thought of the greatness of the Master you serve, and of the infinite recompense promised. The mother of Saint Melitho said: "The pains are short, the joys endless." Call to mind these words, when you feel discouraged in your work or trials. "Rejoice, my soul," said Saint Chrysologus; "for the afflictions you undergo are transitory, while the glory awaiting you is eternal."

The same holy father, speaking of the recompense which God bestows on His faithful servants, and of that which Satan confers on his followers, says: "Behold how the devil rewards the services rendered to him! Death terminates life, and begins the torture. But the servants of Jesus despise death, and receive eternal bliss for their recompense." The poor renegade deserved the former, the firm and persevering soldiers obtained the latter. Whose service do you choose? For whose love will you labor and suffer? To whom do you offer up your works and toils?

"I, says the Prophet David, "speak my works to the King" - - that is, "to God, the King of kings-- to Him I dedicate all my labors; whatsoever I do or suffer, it is for His love and honor, and my sole aim is to serve Him" (Ps. xliv.). The memory of the great reward promised to the faithful servant urged him to say this, as he himself tells us: "I have inclined my heart to do Thy justifications forever, for the reward" (Ps. cxviii.). Imitate his example. Offer all to the Lord, and serve Him with zeal and joy. "Serve ye the Lord with gladness," says David (Ps. xcix.); A servant works with joy when he is promised great wages. Your pay is infinitely great: serve God, then, with joy; but also persevere to the end. If, like the poor wretch, you desert the service of Jesus and enter that of Satan, you need hope for no reward in heaven. For Truth itself has said: "But he that shall persevere unto the end, he shall be saved" (Matt. x.).




 
 
 
 
 
 
March 10 - Honoring the Forty Holy Martyrs of Sebaste, Armenia (+320) - Their names are: Acacius, Aetius, Aglaius, Alexander, Angus, Athanasius, Candidus, Chudion, Claudius, Cyril, Cyrion, Dometian, Domnus, Ecdicius, Elias, Eunoicus, Eutyches, Eutychius, Flavius, Gaius, Gorgonius, Helianus, Herachus, Hesychius, John, Lysimachus, Meliton, Nicholas, Philoctemon, Priscus, Sacerdon, Severian, Sisinius, Smaragdus, Theodulus, Theophilus, VaIens, Valerius, Vivianus, and Xanthias.
 
 

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X
OUR FATHER

Our Father, Who Art In Heaven
Hallowed Be Thy Name.
Thy Kingdom come,
Thy Will be done
On earth as it is in Heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread
And forgive us our trespasses
As we forgive those who trespass against us.
Liberate us from all temptation[*]
And deliver us from all evil. Amen



[*] Liberate us is in keeping with the original Latin text.
       God usually does not "lead us" to temptation
       (unless we are tested),
       but gives us the grace to overcome and/or resist it
X
HAIL MARY

Hail Mary, full of grace
The Lord is with thee.
Blessed art though among women,
And blessed is the fruit
Of thy womb, Jesus.
 
Holy Mary, Mary of God
Pray for us sinners
Now, and in the hour
Of our death. Amen


 
X
APOSTLE'S CREED

I believe in God, the Father Almighty Creator of Heaven and earth;
And in Jesus Christ, His Only Son, our Lord;
Who was conceived by the
[work and grace of the] Holy Ghost,[*]
Born of the Virgin Mary,
Suffered under Pontius Pilate,
Was crucified, died and was buried.
He descended into the Dead.[**]
On the third day, He rose again;
He ascended into Heaven,
And sits at the right hand of God,
the Father Almighty.
From thence he shall come to judge
the living and the dead.
 
I believe in the Holy Ghost,[*]
The Holy Catholic Church,
The communion of saints,
The forgiveness of sins.
The resurrection of the body,
And life everlasting. Amen


[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
[**] the Dead: "inferi", the underworld or the dead in Latin.
X
GLORIA

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Ghost[*],
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and ever shall be, world without end.
Amen

[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
X
DE PROFUNDIS

Out of the depths I have cried to Thee, O Lord:
Lord, hear my voice.
Let Thine ears be attentive
to the voice of my supplication.

If thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities:
Lord, who shall abide it.
For with Thee there is merciful forgiveness:
and because of Thy law,
I have waited for Thee, O Lord.

My soul hath waited on His word:
my soul hath hoped in the Lord.
From the morning-watch even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.

For with the Lord there is mercy:
and with Him plenteous redemption.
And He shall redeem Israel
from all her iniquities.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Ghost[*],
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and ever shall be, world without end.
Amen

[*] Holy Ghost: may be substituted with the current Holy Spirit.
X
DE PROFUNDIS

Out of the depths I have cried to Thee, O Lord:
Lord, hear my voice.
Let Thine ears be attentive to the voice
of my supplication.

If thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities:
Lord, who shall abide it.
For with Thee there is merciful forgiveness:
and because of Thy law,
I have waited for Thee, O Lord.

My soul hath waited on His word:
my soul hath hoped in the Lord.
From the morning-watch even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.

For with the Lord there is mercy:
and with Him plenteous redemption.
And He shall redeem Israel
from all his iniquities.

V. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord.
R. And let perpetual light shine upon them.
V. From the gate of hell.
R. Deliver their souls, O Lord.
V. May they rest in peace.
R. Amen.
V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. And let my cry come unto Thee.
V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with Thy Spirit.

(50 days indulgence to all who pray the De Profundis with V. and R.
"Requiem aeternam" (Eternal Rest) three times a day.
Pope Leo XIII, February 3, 1888)


Let us pray:
O God, the Creator and Redeemer of all
the faithful, we beseech Thee to grant
to the souls of Thy servants the remission
of their sins, so that by our prayers
they may obtain pardon for which they long.
O Lord, who lives and reigns,
world without end. Amen

May they rest in peace. Amen

CERRAR
SIGUIENTE
PADRE NUESTRO

Padre Nuestro,
que estas en los Cielos
Santificado sea Tu Nombre;
Venga a nosotros tu Reino;
Hágase Tu Voluntad
en la tierra como en el cielo.
Danos hoy nuestro pan de cada día;
Perdona nuestras ofensas,
Como también nosotros
perdonamos a los que nos ofenden,
No nos dejes caer en la tentación,
y líbranos del mal. Amén
 
CERRAR
SIGUIENTE
AVE MARÍA

Dios te salve, María,
llena eres de gracia;
El Señor es Contigo;
Bendita Tú eres
entre todas las mujeres,
Y bendito es el fruto
De tu vientre, Jesús.
 
Santa María,
Madre de Dios,
Ruega por nosotros
pecadores,
Ahora y en la hora
De nuestra muerte.
Amén
 
CERRAR
CREDO

Creo en Dios, Padre Todopoderoso,
Creador del cielo y de la tierra.
Creo en Jesucristo,
Su único Hijo, Nuestro Señor,
Que fue concebido por obra
y gracia del Espíritu Santo,
Nació de la Santa María Virgen;
Padeció bajo el poder de Poncio Pilato,
Fue crucificado, muerto y sepultado,
Descendió a los infiernos,
Al tercer día resucitó de entre los muertos,
Subió a los cielos
Y está sentado a la derecha de Dios,
Padre Todopoderoso.
Desde allí ha de venir a juzgar
a los vivos y a los muertos.

Creo en el Espíritu Santo,
La Santa Iglesia Católica,
La comunión de los santos,
El perdón de los pecados,
La resurrección de la carne
Y la vida eterna. Amén
 
 
CERRAR
DE PROFUNDIS

Desde lo hondo a Ti grito, Señor; Señor,
escucha mi voz;
Estén Tus oidos atentos
a la voz de mi súplica.

Si llevas cuenta de los delitos, Señor,
¿quién podrá resistir?
Pero de ti procede el perdón,
y así infundes respeto.
Mi alma espera en el Señor.

Espera en su palabra;
mi alma aguarda al Señor,
más que el centinela la aurora.
Aguarda Israel al Señor.

Como el centinela la aurora;
porque del Señor viene la misericordia.
la redención copiosa;
y Él redimirá a Israel de todos sus delitos.

Gloria al Padre, al Hijo y al
Espíritu Santo,
como es desde el principio,
es ahora y será por los siglos de los siglos.
Amén

X
GLORIA

Gloria al Padre, al Hijo y al
Espíritu Santo,
como es desde el principio,
es ahora y será por los siglos de los siglos.
Amén

CERRAR
DE PROFUNDIS y QUE DESCANSEN EN PAZ

Desde lo hondo a Ti grito, Señor;
Señor, escucha mi voz;
Estén Tus oidos atentos a
la voz de mi súplica.

Si llevas cuenta de los delitos, Señor,
¿quién podrá resistir?

Pero de ti procede el perdón,
y así infundes respeto.
Mi alma espera en el Señor.

Espera en su palabra;
mi alma aguarda al Señor,
más que el centinela la aurora.
Aguarda Israel al Señor.

Como el centinela la aurora;
porque del Señor viene la misericordia,
la redención copiosa;
y Él redimirá a Israel de todos sus delitos.

V. Dadles, Señor, a todas las almas
el descanso eterno.
R. Y haced lucir sobre ellas
vuestra eterna luz.
V. Que en paz descansen.
R. Amén.